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NoelFae
04-30-2017, 02:07 PM
So I'm a noob fish owner and plant owner and panic about everything
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170430/45e7913c8ae6ae6d290a59ba7f6f8ce1.jpg

What is this radioactive plant doing lmao

madagascariensis
04-30-2017, 02:31 PM
That's blue-green algae, which is not actually an alga but rather a photosynthetic bacterium. They tend to bloom in waters with high organic content, and some species may produce environmental toxins harmful to animals.
I'd remove as much as I can with the siphon/gravel vac, and increase the frequency and size of water changes.

NoelFae
04-30-2017, 03:26 PM
That's blue-green algae, which is not actually an alga but rather a photosynthetic bacterium. They tend to bloom in waters with high organic content, and some species may produce environmental toxins harmful to animals.
I'd remove as much as I can with the siphon/gravel vac, and increase the frequency and size of water changes.

Would high organic content be because I have too many plants?

Slaphppy7
04-30-2017, 03:39 PM
No...could be from overfeeding, though

AmazonJoe
04-30-2017, 03:53 PM
madagascariensis got the nail on the head to much organics it could come from food and yes also from dead plant material but just siphon it off the plants and do water changes and this will help a ton

NoelFae
04-30-2017, 04:19 PM
Okay. I did a 50% water change and scrubbed all my deco with hot water and a brand new toothbrush. Ran my plants under water to get all the mulm off and removed the radioactive leaf [emoji261]

AmazonJoe
04-30-2017, 04:21 PM
Next time no need to remove the plants if you run the siphon hose over the leaves the blue-green algae should come right off.

NoelFae
04-30-2017, 04:26 PM
Next time no need to remove the plants if you run the siphon hose over the leaves the blue-green algae should come right off.

My siphon isn't very good it's a cheap one from petsmart so it doesn't do that [emoji23] I need to pick up a better one

I just used gloves and pulled the leaf off

madagascariensis
04-30-2017, 08:02 PM
The cyanobacteria won't go away quickly. It will take perhaps weeks of water quality control and removal before it is eradicated.

because of this you probably should try to take it off the leaves as opposed to pulling leaves off, the cyanobacteria will re-colonize faster than the plant can grow.

NoelFae
04-30-2017, 09:46 PM
The cyanobacteria won't go away quickly. It will take perhaps weeks of water quality control and removal before it is eradicated.

because of this you probably should try to take it off the leaves as opposed to pulling leaves off, the cyanobacteria will re-colonize faster than the plant can grow.

If I take the plant out will that stop it? Cause he has looots of other plants

madagascariensis
04-30-2017, 10:19 PM
The cyanobacteria is growing on the plants. The plants are not the cause of bloom.The cause is high levels of nitrate and other waste products in the water.

NoelFae
04-30-2017, 10:26 PM
The cyanobacteria is growing on the plants. The plants are not the cause of bloom.The cause is high levels of nitrate and other waste products in the water.

Okaydoke I'll just keep an eye on stuff then. I tested today though and my Nitrates weren't any higher than usual. So it's more likely waste

NoelFae
05-01-2017, 08:20 PM
So few questions:
What other actions can I do to stop this? I read turning lights off helps is that true?

My tap water has 10ppm of Nitrates in it all the time so how helpful are water changes going to be if Nitrates are the cause of the algae?

What's a good gravel vacuum/siphon?
[emoji4]

Slaphppy7
05-01-2017, 08:24 PM
https://www.amazon.com/25-Foot-Python-Aquarium-Maintenance/dp/B000255NXC

NoelFae
05-06-2017, 03:54 AM
okay I bought that vacuum and it's going to be here tuesday because they didn't have it at my fishy storeeeee rip

AmazonJoe
05-06-2017, 01:50 PM
Also I remove the "algae" by hand whenever I see it. Jus rub your index finger and thumb over the leaf it should rub right off and into the trash :)

NoelFae
05-10-2017, 02:54 AM
So I found the vacuum isn't picking up the algae off the plants so I rubbed everything off and tried to vacuum it up from the gravel or took it right out of the tank if it stayed on my fingers.

My sink has some draining issues so we're going to fix it tomorrow and try again.

I also think I've found the problem. There's a lot of yuck in my gravel that my other siphon wasn't picking up - thanks petsmart - so I'm thinking tomorrow I'll pull everything out and give the gravel a really good cleaning with this new vacuum.

Are huge water changes dangerous? Or should I be okay since good bacteria is in the filter not the water?

I ended up doing about 50% today just from trying to get into the gravel and this tube is huge vs my 10 gal. Would I be okay to do another big one tomorrow - hopefully less with nothing in the way - or should I not?

madagascariensis
05-10-2017, 03:06 AM
Are huge water changes dangerous? Or should I be okay since good bacteria is in the filter not the water?


Yes and no. Huge water changes are not inherently dangerous. It's the fluctuations in water temperature and other parameters that may be caused by large water changes that are really dangerous.
In a neglected tank where the tank water has decreased pH, high nitrates and other altered parameters, a large water change can be harmful since the tap water parameters are radically different.
In a tank with a history of regular water changes, the tank's parameters are similar to that of the tap water and you can change large amounts of water, provided you match the temperature and dechlorinate the water.

NoelFae
05-10-2017, 03:09 AM
Yes and no. Huge water changes are not inherently dangerous. It's the fluctuations in water temperature and other parameters that may be caused by large water changes that are really dangerous.
In a neglected tank where the tank water has decreased pH, high nitrates and other altered parameters, a large water change can be harmful since the tap water parameters are radically different.
In a tank with a history of regular water changes, the tank's parameters are similar to that of the tap water and you can change large amounts of water, provided you match the temperature and dechlorinate the water.

My usual water changes are 10%-20% a week and I always try to keep the temperature almost exact (I have a "water changing thermometer") my nitrates are usually steady around 20 - though the last check today they were high but I did a change and hopefully they'll drop

UserName
05-10-2017, 12:06 PM
Not to change the subject entirely, but I never really understood the whole Python system. wouldn't it totally mess up the tank water's PH and Temp ect? Not to mention the added chlorine and Chloramine?

Slaphppy7
05-10-2017, 12:09 PM
Not to change the subject entirely, but I never really understood the whole Python system. wouldn't it totally mess up the tank water's PH and Temp ect? Not to mention the added chlorine and Chloramine?

All it is basically is a hose to fill/drain the tank, doesn't affect water parameters one bit

NoelFae
05-10-2017, 12:28 PM
All it is basically is a hose to fill/drain the tank, doesn't affect water parameters one bit

I'm a little unsure how to use it to fill the tank - because you can't put water conditioner into the tap?

Slaphppy7
05-10-2017, 12:30 PM
As you begin to fill the tank, you add the water conditioner to the tank....it mixes in the tank, not in the Python

NoelFae
05-10-2017, 12:34 PM
That won't harm the fish? I always thought it had to sit for a while for the conditioner to start working

So you would just put how ever much conditioner in and then put the water in?

Slaphppy7
05-10-2017, 12:40 PM
I always thought it had to sit for a while for the conditioner to start working



Not at all, Prime begins working instantly.

Here's what I do: fill my syringe with the proper amount of Prime (1 ml/10G), and set it by the tank...run my tap through the Python into the sink, with my digital thermometer probe in the stream of water coming out of the Python...adjust tap temp until it matches my tank (78F)....then close the valve on the Python, carry to my tank, slowly open the valve to begin filling, then squirt the Prime into the stream of tap water coming out of the Python

UserName
05-10-2017, 12:44 PM
That won't harm the fish? I always thought it had to sit for a while for the conditioner to start working

So you would just put how ever much conditioner in and then put the water in?

Think of the water conditioner like you would a tea bag. As soon as you drop a teabag into water it starts to work immediately. Yes, it takes a little time to get a good cup of tea, but the longer it sits in the water the more it disperses in the cup. Hope that helps.

NoelFae
05-10-2017, 12:47 PM
Hmm that makes life easier than - other than my sink draining issues because siphoning out of a bucket takes forever

NoelFae
05-11-2017, 01:45 AM
My sink is fixed hurrah!

And I did my big gravel clean/water change, and put some paraguard in because I'm probably stressing out my fish and don't want him to get sick ;3;

Gonna keep an eye on my parameters for a few days to make sure nothing bad happens and pray that this algae is on the road to leaving

NoelFae
05-11-2017, 11:09 AM
So I tested this morning and I'm not picking up any NitrAtes at all.

Is that bad? ;3;

Slaphppy7
05-11-2017, 12:07 PM
It's not bad, but it's not common, either.

NoelFae
05-11-2017, 12:11 PM
It's not bad, but it's not common, either.

I'm gonna keep an eye on it for a few days and see what happens.

Also I wanted to ask, can I swap out all my filter media for bio media? Like I already did the carbon, but could I switch the sponge too?

Slaphppy7
05-11-2017, 12:14 PM
Yes, you can switch the sponge for more media; you may lose some of your BB by doing this, just keep an eye on params for the next few days following the switch, and perform WC's as necessary.

The BB should repopulate on the new media pretty quickly.

Be sure to rinse any new ceramic media before use, it can be pretty dusty straight out of the package.

angelcraze2
05-11-2017, 08:48 PM
I've dealt with cyanobacteria a few times myself and I keep my tanks really clean with TDS less than 100 most of the time. I beleive my cyano cane in with plants. In a tank with high organics, if the bacteria takes hold, it can be very difficult to erradicate. If/when I see it, I get rid of it right away, even if I have to siphon just the cyano out for a small water top-up. Just be very sure to rinse out your syphon after draining it out. You don't want to add it back in when you fill the tank. I might even use a seperate syphon to suck up the cyano and be careful not to reinfect the tank with cyano on your fingers. Spot treating with h202 hydrogen peroxide helps. Just get the 3% kind with no stabilizer additives, get a medicine syringe and slowly squeeze out the peroxide while the filters and powerheads are off. The peroxide will sink, so let it go just above the cyano. You'll see it bubble, and that's ok. After 15 mins, plug your filter in again. But the best way is manual removal, rub the cyano off in the direction of the syphon intake and let it suck it all up. Rinse your siphon well and let dry as much as possible.

You can make your own draining syphon with a syphon head and tubing from a hardware store. I used to use a small one and just drain into a bucket and rinse it all throughly and my hands!

Another thing that seems to help with cyano is heterotrophic bacteria. There are aquarium products that add this, I can't remember the names atm, but I use SeptiBac from Giant Tiger. It cost about 3$ max. I just fill a media bag with 1tbsp per 90 or so gallons, and place the media bag with powder in front of the filter flow overnight, swishing it every now and then.

angelcraze2
05-11-2017, 08:57 PM
So I tested this morning and I'm not picking up any NitrAtes at all.

Is that bad? ;3;

In a well planted tank with a low bioload, it is more common. I've never registered nitrate in my tanks since I heavily planted my low stocked tanks.

NoelFae
05-11-2017, 09:08 PM
In a well planted tank with a low bioload, it is more common. I've never registered nitrate in my tanks since I heavily planted my low stocked tanks.

I have one betta and lots of plants but my tap water has Nitrates in it usually so that's why I pick them up

angelcraze2
05-11-2017, 09:23 PM
Your plants are probably consuming the nitrate as fertilizer from your tap. It wouldn't take long for them to process it.

NoelFae
05-19-2017, 02:15 PM
So I'm still dealing with this, but wondering how awful it is for my fish?

If it's awful for my fish, could I move him and his heater and filter back into my 5.5 while I get rid of it in the 10? Or will moving the filter move the bacteria too?

Any other tips for getting rid of it? I've been taking it off the plants, and watching for it in the gravel and doing water changes and testing, but it's still here :X

angelcraze2
05-19-2017, 03:53 PM
Are you talking about the cyano?

NoelFae
05-19-2017, 03:54 PM
Are you talking about the cyano?

Yes [emoji27]

NoelFae
05-19-2017, 03:59 PM
The only thing I haven't tried is the peroxide because apparently I missed that post lmao

What kind of peroxide would I use? I'm guessing not what I buy at the drug store?

In that case I would turn off my filter, put the peroxide directly on the bacteria - in the gravel? Sit for 15 and then turn my heater back on?

Is this not dangerous for my fish?

angelcraze2
05-19-2017, 06:25 PM
I use peroxide from Dollarama lol. Look for 3% peroxide with no added stabilizers. The stuff at the $ store has only purified water as a non-active ingredient. I have dosed up to 1ml per gallon. Half the amount used if you want to be safe and if you have any inverts.

Yes, you turn off your filters, let the water still, get a medicine syringe, fill it up no more than ml/gallon and let the peroxide 'fall' (it sinks) onto the cyano. Don't dump the peroxide on a fish or invert, but it will start to bubble right away. With the lighting, the peroxide actually changes to oxygen, so it's safe. Just don't let it permeate for too long, I've killed plants with it in the substrate. 15 mins is good.

angelcraze2
05-19-2017, 06:28 PM
You can also try a complete 5 day blackout. You'll have to cover all sides of your tank with black garbage bags. Cover the top with a dark towel. No peeking, not even to feed the fish for 5 days. You may feed your fish in the dark of you want, but your fish can go a few days without eating no problem.