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fishlove
01-19-2017, 05:57 PM
Can anyone give me their opinions or experience with Angelfish & different algae eaters. Also keeping in mind if there were Discus in the tank as well. I'm just trying to get some ideas. I appreciate it ;)

I currently have a sailfin pleco in my 65 gallon who's currently 4" and will have to be moved to my 125 gallon when he's bigger, so that is also something to keep in mind. On the other hand, if we're looking at keeping Angels & Discus together, the pleco may not be good for the slime coat of the Discus, I'm aware of that, but does anyone have experience keeping them together (Discus & sailfin)?

I also have my eye on some of the following:
Siamese algae eater
Loaches (but what kind, a lot of them get big & you have to keep groups (?)
Otocinclus

Or do I get myself a couple snails? What snails in particular?

SueD
01-19-2017, 06:10 PM
No experience with discus but I have one angel in a tank that also has a bristle nose pleco, a couple of otos, and a nerite snail. The nerite snail is the best for certain algae, the pleco doesn't do much of anything, but she's about 3-4 yrs old now. I actually get surprised when I even see the otos in there. They've been around for maybe 4-5 years now and I see them most when I do a water change or occasionally if I add zucchini for the BNP.

AmazonJoe
01-19-2017, 06:40 PM
I like BNP's but just like majority of plecos there algae consumption slows with age. Otos are awesome as well and have small bioloads so you can add a large group and it won't have a huge impact on your overall stocking. Plus since they both originate from the Amazon ;) they will have similiar water requirements

angelcraze2
01-19-2017, 06:43 PM
I also have no experience with discus, but I've kept tiger plecos and bushynose plecos with angelfish.

My experience with the tiger plecos wasn't the greatest. Although I beleive the tiger plecos were more carnivorous than algae eaters. My tiger plecos were in a 120g and I think they were getting ready to breed. When I brought them to my LFS, the female looked gravid. Anyway, I noticed circular suck marks with missing scales on the flanks of my angelfish (that's why the plecos had to go back to the LFS). I beleive the plecos were attacking/protecting at night while the angels were sleeping. I don't know if it was the fault of the plecos or if something parasitic or an infection came in with the fish I rescued, but I lost my pair of angels that shared the same side as the plecos for territory.

In my 90g tank:
I haven't seen any issue with the bushynose plecos, aside from them occasionally chasing the angels away from their cave or food. The bushynose plecos also will eat angel eggs if they notice them. But I haven't seen any injuries from keeping those plecos with angelfish.

Boundava
01-19-2017, 08:06 PM
Not sure about plecos and angels/discus, but like Joe said; plecos don't really eat algae to be thought of as algae control-the only one that may eat algae consistently throughout its life would be the rubberlip, but it thrives in a high oxygen/flow river type systems.

As for loaches, most loaches are social so you would need a group if you want them to thrive in your tank, and the more you get the more likely you will get the best activity from them since confidence(=activity) comes with bigger numbers.

DoubleDutch
01-19-2017, 08:22 PM
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170119/a6109fcf9b19122069f352ef939dcb85.jpgFunny : Post alike at Fishlore.
My rubberlip is 99% carnivorious though.

Not sure about plecos and angels/discus, but like Joe said; plecos don't really eat algae to be thought of as algae control-the only one that may eat algae consistently throughout its life would be the rubberlip, but it thrives in a high oxygen/flow river type systems.

As for loaches, most loaches are social so you would need a group if you want them to thrive in your tank, and the more you get the more likely you will get the best activity from them since confidence(=activity) comes with bigger numbers.


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Boundava
01-19-2017, 08:36 PM
Well there you go! Lol, this is all wrong...


http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/pleco/rubberlipped.php

What a cutie BTW!

DoubleDutch
01-19-2017, 09:21 PM
Don't think it is al wrong, but the different species have different habits and needs I think.
Btw : my bn's love protein ik their diet as well.

This pic will be in the March issue of Practical Fishkeeping Magazine. Quite proud hahaha !

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angelcraze2
01-19-2017, 09:32 PM
Haha, I forgot to read the rest of the OP's post about looking for algae control and just gave my experience keeping plecos with angelfish.

For algae control, I go with nerite snails. They eat all types of algae except filamentous, even tough green spot algae. A pleco or oto will never be able to rasp off GSA. Otos are great for soft brown algae, which usually dies off after a tank matures, so you would have to supplement their diet with algae wafers as well. But they would be nice safe fish to keep with larger fish like angels since they are rather timid AND cute!

I still vote for nerite snails, the only draw back is they might leave eggs on your plant leaves, hardscape and glass. These eggs won't hatch in freshwater, so no worry about a snail explosion, but the eggs are very stuck to the surface they are laid on and take a while to disintegrate. Some aquarist find this to be an extreme eye-sore, but that being said, I pick the eggs off my plant leaves from time to time and my tetras eat the picked off eggs. It's quite easy to use a razor blade to remove any eggs on the glass.

AmazonJoe
01-19-2017, 09:33 PM
Don't think it is al wrong, but the different species have different habits and needs I think.
Btw : my bn's love protein ik their diet as well.

This pic will be in the March issue of Practical Fishkeeping Magazine. Quite proud hahaha !

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My BNP is also carnivorous !

angelcraze2
01-19-2017, 09:36 PM
Don't think it is al wrong, but the different species have different habits and needs I think.
Btw : my bn's love protein ik their diet as well.

This pic will be in the March issue of Practical Fishkeeping Magazine. Quite proud hahaha !

Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G925F met Tapatalk

Haha congrats, (s)he's a beauty for sure and a very nice shot!

angelcraze2
01-19-2017, 09:39 PM
My BNP is also carnivorous !

Mine too. They eat algae when young, like you said already, but they need driftwood in the tank for fiber. I witnessed my female BN eating all the angelfish eggs right in front of my eyes. I was pretty sad :( But at least she got good nutrition, she is breeding as well and everyone needs good nutrtion, especially spawning mamas.

FYI most algae wafers have protein included, and the BN plecos will clean up any angelfish food that makes it to the bottom along with the assassin snails!

Taurus
01-20-2017, 05:09 PM
In general, it's the fish keeper's job to keep tank algae under control. Snails, shrimp and fish may help.

WhistlingBadger
01-20-2017, 05:52 PM
...the only draw back is they might leave eggs on your plant leaves, hardscape and glass. These eggs won't hatch in freshwater, so no worry about a snail explosion, but the eggs are very stuck to the surface they are laid on and take a while to disintegrate. Some aquarist find this to be an extreme eye-sore...

This is why I quit keeping nerites--I got tired of their little fly specks everywhere. Other than that, they're great snails, and the only kind I've ever been able to keep alive for more than a couple months.

WhistlingBadger
01-20-2017, 05:58 PM
As for some of your other questions:
Loaches, in my experience, don't eat much algae, though they are really fun. Some of them are quite aggressive, so I'd really do some serious research before keeping them with angels.

Siamese algae eaters are highly overrated, in my opinion. I've had a few of them, and they'll pick at the algae some, but they don't live up to other people's reports. My theory is that there are actually several very closely related subspecies that are impossible to tell apart; some are exclusive algae eaters and others are generalist scavengers.

I recently put four panda garra in my Angkor tank. They go after the algae like crazy, and so far they are quite peaceful. (They're only about half grown) I've read that some of the garra clan can get aggressive as they get older, so we'll see. They also need a tightly covered tank, as they occasionally enjoy going for a walk.

I'm planning on putting a goodly school of otos in my Orinoco tank when the time comes. You can keep the glass clean easily, and not scratch up the glass, with an old plastic credit card, library card, driver's license.

Taurus
01-20-2017, 07:10 PM
Magic Eraser sponges or the equivalent generic work great at cleaning most algae from the glass. Just make sure to get the ones without any foaming or other cleaning agents in them. They're also safe to use on silicone seals.

https://www.amazon.com/Mr-Clean-Magic-Eraser-Original/dp/B0071SCSO0?th=1#customerReviews

fishlove
01-20-2017, 07:12 PM
I still vote for nerite snails, the only draw back is they might leave eggs on your plant leaves, hardscape and glass.

Sounds like a horse a piece with these guys. Good cleaners with the exception of leaving their eggs behind. They are interesting!

fishlove
01-20-2017, 07:16 PM
Magic Eraser sponges or the equivalent generic work great at cleaning most algae from the glass. Just make sure to get the ones with any foaming or other cleaning agents in them.

I have been using a handheld algae scrubber but recently picked up a MagFloat. Can't wait to try it and keep my hands dry ;)

Taurus
01-20-2017, 07:23 PM
I like the magic eraser sponges better because you can use them on the silicone without damaging it.

RiversGirl
01-20-2017, 07:52 PM
This pic will be in the March issue of Practical Fishkeeping Magazine. Quite proud hahaha !



Congratulations!

mac
01-20-2017, 07:54 PM
One thing I did not notice from the OP is what type of algae are you wanting to control?
SAE as great for a broad spectrum of algae. These would work perfectly with Angles and I can't see why they would not work with discus. But the down side to SAE is they are a schooling fish. So at least 6 or more, and they are quite large once they mature.
BNP can be good at the average amount of algae. But on the whole they seem more intent on eating shrimp pellets for the cory than algae for me.

AmazonJoe
01-20-2017, 08:27 PM
Great addition mac not all fish eat all different types of algae.

I say till don't forget the otocinclus I really like these little guys they are social needing more then 5 usually they're also extremely peaceful.

Don't forget though with which ever fish you get you supplement the diet mainly with fresh veggies like zucchini,squash,sweet potatoes,spinach etc...

WhistlingBadger
01-20-2017, 10:16 PM
You know, I keep a single SAE in my 55. He hangs with the chain loaches and panda garra, and seems pretty confident and happy. Not ideal, but it works.

fishlove
01-21-2017, 01:37 AM
Yes, Congrats DD on your pictorial! How awesome is that ;)

fishlove
01-21-2017, 01:44 AM
One thing I did not notice from the OP is what type of algae are you wanting to control?
SAE as great for a broad spectrum of algae. These would work perfectly with Angles and I can't see why they would not work with discus. But the down side to SAE is they are a schooling fish. So at least 6 or more, and they are quite large once they mature.
BNP can be good at the average amount of algae. But on the whole they seem more intent on eating shrimp pellets for the cory than algae for me.

I do have brown algae (diatoms) in my 65 but it's rather new (4.5 months) so that could be part of it, other than my negligence on WC's (but I'm better now). My sailfin has done a pretty good job in that tank ;)
I was favoring the SAE but wasn't completely hooked due to them getting big & schooling. I have the room, I just don't want them causing problems for other fish I have once they get bigger.

WhistlingBadger
01-21-2017, 02:56 AM
In my experience SAEs do get pretty big, but not aggressive. My experience is limited, so you'll want to make sure of that, but I'm pretty sure that's the general consensus. You want to stay away from Chinese/Golden algae eaters, though--they're pretty and do a decent job when they're young, but once they're full grown it's open season on anybody they can catch.

mac
01-21-2017, 03:08 AM
SAEs IME and IMO are very decent fish to keep, even when mature.
The whole time I had them they were very peaceful. One thing I could liken them to ottos just way bigger and a lot more like a hoovering dragon fly.

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