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angelcraze2
11-01-2016, 08:33 PM
So, I purposely keep ramshorn snails in my tanks. But in some tanks, there are not enough diatoms to keep their shells healthy in my soft water. (I use ramshorns to eat brown algae in new tanks)

So I accidently broke a piece of the shell off one of my badly etched ramshorns. I didn't want it to suffer, so I tossed it the assassin snail tank. Before it even hit the substrate, one of my sub-adult angelfish mouthed it, then went after it again and I actually witnessed the angelfish suck the snail right out and she ate it!

Just never saw an angelfish eat a ramshorn snail, but they never seem to make it long in my juvie tanks kind to think of it.

They also love to eat squished small pond snails. I know this for sure too.

RiversGirl
11-01-2016, 09:17 PM
How neat that you were able to witness that!

mermaidwannabe
11-02-2016, 12:54 AM
How would ramshorn snails do in a cooler tank? If they eat diatoms, I may get a few. Ever since I installed my new light, I've had diatoms that won't go away. Even put a phosphate reducer in my filter, and it doesn't help much. Phosphates were around 1 when I tested. Are the rams strictly tropical?

angelcraze2
11-02-2016, 05:13 PM
No way! My friend just pulled some NICE ramshorns out of his pond outside, the water is very very cold right now here in Canada. They might like cold water better?

angelcraze2
11-02-2016, 05:20 PM
I'm not sure of you can entirely test phosphates in tanks? I bet I have a lot! And I water change weekly 40-50%! I remember looking into that before. How do you test for phosphates? Is it a kit from API? Does it measure all the phosphates?

angelcraze2
11-02-2016, 05:26 PM
Actually, your signature shows you already have snails. Any snail should go for the diatoms first. I would suggest nerite snails instead, since they don't reproduce in freshwater. Ramshorns never become a pest in my tanks, but others find they reproduce too quickly and become pests. Just wanted to let you know :)

mermaidwannabe
11-03-2016, 01:44 AM
API does put out a test kit for phosphates. I put some Phos-Guard into my filter to bring them down. I'm not sure what you mean by "all" phosphates. The test has shown around the 1 mark.

I may get some Ramshorns next time I'm at the LFS. If they do well in cold water, that's great. Mine is a cooler tank. The snails I have in there don't do much about clearing diatoms off the glass or plant leaves. Maybe they're too few and too small? There's also an ongoing problem with their shells turning white from lack of calcium. Eventually, they die and the Dojos eat them.

angelcraze2
11-03-2016, 03:49 AM
That's what happens to my ramhorns! I really suggest you get a couple nerite snails instead. They might be a little more pricey, but their shells are much tougher and they do a miraculous job at cleaning ALL types of algae (except filamentous, but diatoms being their favorite! ) I broke down and bought 5 new ones for my 120g, because the ramshorns I seeded it with just aren't taking off. The nerites are much more efficient at cleaning, and the worse they'll leave you with is eggs that don't hatch, but no nuisance out of control snails.

FYI
The bigger ones like to clean the glass and substrate, the smaller (or younger) ones I see cleaning the leaves of plants.
You should have a cover on your tank, they go above water level sometimes, and have been known to crawl out.

mermaidwannabe
11-03-2016, 04:12 AM
If the nerites can tolerate colder water, that's what I'll get. There's no heater in my tank and never has been. I have cold-water fish species and my current snails that come in with plants seem to be okay with it. I do have a tight lid on the tank, as I have Dojos, and if they were to find a way to escape, they would get out, sure as can be.

angelcraze2
11-14-2016, 08:08 PM
From what I read, can't speak for myself since I keep tropical tanks, nerites are just fine in water 69/70f. Does your tank get colder than that?