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prog_frog
07-16-2016, 11:59 AM
Hello,

We have a 10g freshwater tank that currently has 5 guppies in it. We are considering getting some of the smaller cory catfish (pygmaeus, hastatus, or habrosus) to add, but the pH in the tank is high, around 8.1. It seems this is a fair amount more alkaline than the listed preferred pH of these fish (several sites say 6.4 to 7.4). On the plus side, our KH is high (~12) so the pH is quite stable. Given all of this, would it be OK to add the corys, or is the pH too far outside its range for them to be comfortable?

If it would be OK, follow-up questions would include (a) how many would make sense for a 10g tank, (b) is there a reason to prefer one of these species over the others, and (c) do you have a particular recommendation for an online vendor (we are in the northeastern US).

Thanks so much!

SueD
07-16-2016, 02:04 PM
My PH runs about 7.6, so I'm not sure about something higher, but it's not impossible - they might be able to be acclimated.

I've had the best luck with Habrosus and Hastatus. Not so much with pygmaeus, although others have better experience. If you have to order on-line, I can highly recommend this person - http://msjinkzd.com/stocklist/ I've bough several times from her with great results. She has the pygmaeus available now and if you look toward the bottom, the hastatus are in quarantine so would be available soon. She often has habrosus, too so you could ask about the future availability of those.

Also you could e-mail her about the PH issue. Go to the "how to order" link at the top and there is an e-mail form available. She is very responsive to e-mails, (usually within a day) and very knowledgeable. She has lots of Youtube videos out there as well.

Take a look - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hlDSwA070w

Slaphppy7
07-16-2016, 02:05 PM
Fish can adjust to different ph levels, the trick is to acclimate them slowly

What substrate is in the tank?

I've had all 3 of the pygmys, the hastatus are my favorite...they're the most colorful, and like to "hover" up above the substrate in the water column...fun to watch...you could get 6-8 for a 10G

Here's where I have bought most of my fish from: http://www.wetspottropicalfish.com/

prog_frog
07-16-2016, 04:34 PM
Thanks for the recommendation, SueD. I liked her video and also like that she's relatively close to us. I think reaching out to her is a great idea. If not corys, she may have suggestions about other cleaning crew types that would work well in our tank.

Slaphppy7, the substrate is gravel, but it's not large or sharp. (Oh, and thanks for the little guppy gift last week!)

Slaphppy7
07-16-2016, 05:40 PM
You're welcome.

Just FYI, corys aren't cleaners, they need fish food like any other fish.

SueD
07-16-2016, 07:56 PM
Here's something else to consider and Rachel also has these currently in stock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCf-urnugBs

Paradi
07-16-2016, 08:09 PM
I would imagine they would be fine in that pH. My water here has a pH of 8.5 most of the time, and the water is VERY hard. While I've never had pygmy cories, I've kept and bred thriving bronze cories (some albino) and peppered cories in my water. They all did very well in my tank and were eager to spawn with little effort on my part. I raised the fry, separately, under the same water conditions, and they grew well and joined their parents once they were large enough. I still have peppered cories today and their the most active buggers in the house!

RiversGirl
07-16-2016, 10:21 PM
Here's something else to consider and Rachel also has these currently in stock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCf-urnugBs

Nice suggestion and I enjoyed that video. Thanks Sue

prog_frog
08-08-2016, 02:52 AM
UPDATE: Well, we had our tank spring a leak today, so off to the pet store for a replacement and I was able to convince my wife to upgrade to a 20 gallon long tank. So now I'm wondering if this extra space opens up some more options for us in terms of cory species - I'd be happy with the pygmy varieties but would be curious if anyone had other ideas (also keeping in mind our hard, alkaline water).

Any thoughts? Thanks!

RiversGirl
08-08-2016, 03:18 AM
Congrats on the bigger tank!

Rocksor
08-08-2016, 03:54 AM
Corydoras plateus (pepper cories), Corydoras aenus (bronze and albino cories), and Brochis splendens (green emerald cories) come from areas that are moderate to hard water with neutral to more alkaline water. The first two can thrive in waters as low as 65F, so you will not need a heater if the room temperature does not get below that temperature.

Just because the fish are from South America, doesn't mean that they live in soft low ph water.

AmazonJoe
08-08-2016, 09:52 AM
A lot of commercially available fish are tank raised in higher PH levels then there "wild" counterparts a lot of the information you'll find on seriouslyfish.com for example will be for the natural wild specimens.
I agree with Slap that the acclimation is the most critical I suggest the drip method.

And congrats on the upgrade!

prog_frog
08-08-2016, 10:12 AM
A lot of commercially available fish are tank raised in higher PH levels then there "wild" counterparts a lot of the information you'll find on seriouslyfish.com for example will be for the natural wild specimens.
I agree with Slap that the acclimation is the most critical I suggest the drip method.

And congrats on the upgrade!

Good point, thanks! And we do use drip acclimation for introducing new fish.

SueD
08-08-2016, 02:49 PM
Corydoras plateus (pepper cories), Corydoras aenus (bronze and albino cories), and Brochis splendens (green emerald cories) come from areas that are moderate to hard water with neutral to more alkaline water. The first two can thrive in waters as low as 65F, so you will not need a heater if the room temperature does not get below that temperature.

Just because the fish are from South America, doesn't mean that they live in soft low ph water.

Along with considering these options from Rocksor, a 20 long means you could consider a larger group of one of the dwarfs. That would be a sight to see. Or even 2 different groups, say hastatus AND habrosus. I'm such a fan of the dwarfs, although I have several of the larger ones too. All cories are just so cute, so whichever you choose, you'll surely enjoy them.

Boundava
08-08-2016, 05:20 PM
I have medium-hard water and pH of 7.6 with a variety of corys and they all do very well; albino Corydoras plateus, 4 regular Corydoras plateus, 3 Corydoras leucomelas and even one Brochis splendens cory that is the last of a group of 8 I had and is over 13 years old. Though these are all too big for a 20L the smaller dwarf/pygmy corys should also be able to handle harder water and higher pH if they are not wild or are acclimated over a period of time. If you can find them through a local breeder/store they will already be acclimated to your local waters 90% of the time unless the breeder store uses RO water.