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View Full Version : So,... what is holding you back ?



Cliff
06-29-2014, 12:43 PM
I find comments from time to time from people stating they would like to set-up a marine aquarium someday. If you are one of these people, I am interested to find out why you just don't do it ?

What is stopping you ?

mommy1
06-29-2014, 01:34 PM
I voted other. The only reason I don't have a saltwater tank yet is, I am not in my permanent home yet and sw tanks don't move well. I would rather get my house and have a permanent spot for my sw tank. In the meantime I am slowly researching how to set them up, cycling, and stocking so everything, in theory, goes smoothly when I am ready.

Cliff
06-29-2014, 01:46 PM
I would say that is a lot more than "theory" Mommy1. When you take your time to research, it goes pretty smoothly and easy

Slaphppy7
06-29-2014, 02:05 PM
Really, I would choose the first 5...I really don't have room for another tank of the size I'd like a SW to be...funds are tight right now, they always are this time of year (both daughter's b-days in the same month, ouch)....I have 0 research into SW tanks...it does seem intimidating with all the different equipment and stuff (I know you've told us it's not hard, Cliff)....and I would really have to travel to Houston to get decent fish and equipment at a decent price, or order online and pay the hefty shipping fees (which I have done for FW, I admit)

madagascariensis
06-29-2014, 03:10 PM
Lots of reasons. I heard that SW can be quite expensive and/or high maintenance. However, the main reason I am reluctant to set any new tanks up is because I know that within a year there are going to be very large changes in my life that likely will force me out of the hobby for a while.
Oh well, the fish bug never dies, it only ever sleeps. When I pop out of university, get a job and a semi permanent residence then the real fun can begin.

Trillianne
06-29-2014, 04:46 PM
The place we have is going to require a custom built tank. Which is more expensive and does require more researching for finding a good company for doing such things.

Its also going to take some minor remodel steps, and we want to also re-do our floors... so its getting all the stars to align in the right order to make it happen.

Sandz
06-29-2014, 05:18 PM
Honestly the big thing that stops me is a combo of a lot of thosethings. There are some decent stores around but the cost up front is pretty huge (Ican set up a tank for under 100 easy in fresh)/ the need for the water differences and I dont want to miss heavy salt mixes with evap... I dont really trust myself getting into it to keep up with it long term... the coraline doesnt really apeal to me... the things I want are out of my budget stock wise... A host of things really... I am very much a cichlid lover, thats my niche and what i love dealingwith. I have had or helped maintain many s/w tanks over time and at the end of the day its more work than play for me for less return.

steeler58
06-29-2014, 10:21 PM
I chose 4 because of the remote area I live in, four hours to any big city. I order freshwater fish all the time as many of you know, and I guess saltwater fish would travel as well as fresh but I'd feel even more terrible if one of them perished.

fishmommie
06-29-2014, 10:30 PM
I chose 1 (not enough room) because I really don't have enough room but I'm also afraid it would be too much maintenance and too complex and too pricey. But I'd dearly love to have a SW tank.

genocidex
06-29-2014, 10:33 PM
i just dont have enough money to get all the equipment i need for it lol...

Cliff
06-29-2014, 10:47 PM
Thanks guys. I always wonder about this but (for some reason) never thought to ask

If routine maintenance or perceived complexity is the only thing preventing you from starting up a marine aquarium, then I can easily show you how a marine aquarium can be no more work or hard to understand than a freshwater one (or at least this has been my experience). Those two perceptions held me back until a friend of mine started to explain things to me in simpler terms which really helped me to understand all the things I was trying to research. I would make the same offer to any member here. I think we (the hobbyist) can make things more complex then they need to be sometimes

But it certainly dose cost more for the equipment and livestock. One of the biggest things that I do not like about marine aquariums

Compass
06-30-2014, 01:41 AM
Yes for me it is the cost. Though at this point I can't afford another tank fresh or salt. I do think that by the time I'm ready for another tank, salt water will be on the table for consideration. I'm patient enough to buy what I can when I can. Tank one month, filter the next, lights two more months after that. So it'll come down to whether or not I want to do it more than I want to do other projects I have in my mind.

SomethingIsFishy
06-30-2014, 07:54 PM
I voted money. Did research, bought books, magazines, etc... Started pricing equipment, decided it just wouldn't fit into the budget right now...

Bruno72
09-17-2014, 06:51 AM
Thanks guys. I always wonder about this but (for some reason) never thought to ask

If routine maintenance or perceived complexity is the only thing preventing you from starting up a marine aquarium, then I can easily show you how a marine aquarium can be no more work or hard to understand than a freshwater one (or at least this has been my experience). Those two perceptions held me back until a friend of mine started to explain things to me in simpler terms which really helped me to understand all the things I was trying to research. I would make the same offer to any member here. I think we (the hobbyist) can make things more complex then they need to be sometimes

But it certainly dose cost more for the equipment and livestock. One of the biggest things that I do not like about marine aquariums

The work involved scares me off, so I would love to hear if that is really the case or not. I want to make sure my schedule has time in it to properly care for a SW tank, and what happens if I go away for a vacation for a week or 2. I have friends with FW tanks that assist me, but no one with SW...

MCHRKiller
09-17-2014, 11:02 AM
Reason I have not hit my 5 year cycle to own another Reef.

For whatever reason about every 5 years I get the itch to do a marine tank...I always swear it wont be a reef. It ends up being a reef...and after about 2-3 years of maintenance I become bored to tears with it. I then sell off all of the livestock and promise to never do that again. However 2-3 years after saying that I hit my 5 year cycle and do it again with the same results.

I find that Reefs are no more expensive or complicated that a high tech planted...if anything the planted is more expensive IMO. Reefs once established just sort of run themselves. One of the main reasons I get bored with them is probably that reason they take care of themselves...and I also detest mixing SW and having to haul it to and from the tank. I tore my last reef down prior to moving. It has been about 1.5 years since then and it ran for around 2 years. I went through a phase a few months ago of researching...but fortunately nothing manifested from that :hmm3grin2orange:

Boundava
09-17-2014, 01:58 PM
Honestly, I like looking at saltwater tanks, but I am not at all interested in starting one. Sure it is expensive, yes I don't have room, I honestly have not researched, I do have a LFS that is well equipped, I do think it will be hard (with the salinity, the live rocks, the protein skimmers, the live food, and other challenges I don't even know about), I commute 4+ hours a day so I would not have time to do daily maintenance on the tank (if that is what it needs). My tank is easy to maintain and I love my freshwater planted tanks and will stick with them. I have so many fish to choose from, so much I can do withing freshwater that I am not interested and don't feel a need to jump into the saltwater field.

aquariumlover10
09-18-2014, 01:04 AM
I'm not old enough to have a job, so no supply of money, no tank.