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View Full Version : Co2 Please advise!!



nigeya
11-10-2007, 09:46 PM
I have just recently added some indian fern and java fern to my tank and have been advised to introduce co2 this being the JBL set vario 500 profi set 2 with magnetic shut off???? to assist with the growth of my plants, can i just add this to my tank straight away or do i have to have a certain set up on water chemistry as they talk about certain hardness Ph etc etc, would this do any benefit to my fish or just plants i want my plants for once to flourish and grow in my tank with out going brown and all the leaves falling off within weeks and to be left with a lead ring. i have a 200 litre tank with an ehiem 2126 ext filter and an internal juwel filter my ph is 6.5 and do not know what my hardness is (don't really check this) please help i do not want to buy this and be wasted..

smaug
11-10-2007, 10:48 PM
Ive never known java fern to need co2 but of course it would benefit from it,any plant would.Is this the indian fern you have [see link below]
If these are the only 2 plants you will be having and your lighting is something under 100 watts youl will be ok without co2.They would benefit from seachem fluorish excel which is a good co2 replacement,I use it for now as I do not yet have co2 injection.As far as the plants turning brown and dying off totally I dont think that is as much a lack of co2 as a lack of light,ferts or heat or all three.good luck
http://www.plantgeek.net/plantguide_viewer.php?id=52

Ichthyologist
07-20-2008, 05:27 PM
2-3 watts of light per gallon is the general rule, if you have less then that, CO2 will boost your plant growth, there are plenty of different lights that are sold these days making it easier to grow plants. watch for a boost in algeae growth and use caution when controlling algea so that you do not kill off plants while trying to control the algae.

Drip Loop
07-20-2008, 06:05 PM
2-3 watts of light per gallon is the general rule, if you have less then that, CO2 will boost your plant growth, there are plenty of different lights that are sold these days making it easier to grow plants. watch for a boost in algeae growth and use caution when controlling algea so that you do not kill off plants while trying to control the algae.

Co2 will boost your plant growth under most circumstances. Not just if you have less than 2-3wpg. Carbon is the building block of life after all.

However, you may want to consider Seachem Excell if your only dealing with those two plants. It is a liquid form of carbon that is "almost" just as good as injected co2. Many members of this site have stopped using co2 and switched to excell. A co2 setup can get very expensive and it doesnt seem like your running a huge operation.

PUNISHER VETTE
07-20-2008, 07:20 PM
The reason people are concerned with their hardness with CO2 is with a low hardness the CO2 will drop your pH.

Having a high buffered hardness won't be that much of a change.

Drip Loop
07-20-2008, 08:48 PM
The reason people are concerned with their hardness with CO2 is with a low hardness the CO2 will drop your pH.

Having a high buffered hardness won't be that much of a change.


PH changes due to the addition of Co2 are not harmful to your fish. As long as you are not changing the TDS (total dissolved solids) by using the various buffers in the aquarium the fish will be just fine. You are correct about the KH. Anything lower than 4 can potentially swing wildly throughout the day but the fish shouldnt really notice. As a rule of thumb though, stability is always better. You can expect roughly a drop of 1 full point of PH during the addition of injected co2

dev
09-28-2008, 10:53 AM
PH changes due to the addition of Co2 are not harmful to your fish.

Can this be documented? I have always heard that even slighter changes in the pH level due to co2 injection is less than ideal.

W_Oz
09-29-2008, 06:27 AM
Old thread, but okay.

The fact of the matter is that fish can tollerate a pretty wide range of pH's. The pH of the water these fish were captured/farmed in is likely different than the pH of the water at the pet shop which may be different than the water at your house and if you move the pH of your new house water may be different yet. Fish can by and large cope with these changes provided they aren't happening all the time.

So with the addition of CO2 to a system you're effectively decreasing the pH of the water (making it more acidic) BUT how much you change the pH depends on how hard (buffered) your water is. Drop checkers work on this principle of disolved CO2 changing the pH of the system's water. However for these checkers to work correctly, they need a specific kH of water for them to be accurate. So 20-30ppm of CO2 in one system can swing the pH quite alot of the water is very soft, or hardly at all if the water is very hard.

Back to my point, once your system has CO2 in place and the desired level of CO2 is maintained in that system, the pH of that system will be stable and stability is what fish need in their water parameters to survive.

dev
09-29-2008, 08:49 AM
Yes, that's pretty much how I understand it, and this contradicts what Drip Loop said earlier.

Variations in the pH-level may be harmfull to the fish, regardless if the variation is caused by dissolved acids or dissolved solids.

Even olds threads come up when you search, so it's important that potentially harmfull conclusions are adressed.