PDA

View Full Version : Synspillum, Cory, Tetras



Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:14 PM
Here are some general photos from my two tanks.

31548

31549

31550

31551

DeboraBremner
01-07-2014, 04:24 PM
Those are some great pics!! I've alot to learn about getting pics of my fish, and it seems you have it all figured out!

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:31 PM
Thank you! I have been taking pictures for 6 years now. At times I've done some pro-work for events and often I entered the wildlife competitions.

This is where I upload a lot of my images. Though I've not put up anything for a good few months:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Richard-Peche-Photography/116528471702905

I'd be more than happy to give some pointers or tips based on how I take the photos if anyone is interested.

Slaphppy7
01-07-2014, 04:32 PM
I agree with Debora, very nice pics...i can't get my fish to be still long enough

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:37 PM
I know the feeling! I struggle to snap any sharp images of the Clown Loach or of my SAEs.

Trying increasing the ISO and lowering the exposure compensation. This will give higher shutter speeds which make it easier to capture the images.

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:41 PM
This is probably the star of the tank though...

31552

Slaphppy7
01-07-2014, 04:43 PM
Will do, as soon as I get a decent camera, lol...I just use a cheap little Canon that my wife had before she got a phone that takes better pictures than the camera...I do want a nice (inexpensive) digital camera though

Slaphppy7
01-07-2014, 04:44 PM
That is one gorgeous angel you have.

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:50 PM
Will do, as soon as I get a decent camera, lol...I just use a cheap little Canon that my wife had before she got a phone that takes better pictures than the camera...I do want a nice (inexpensive) digital camera though

A basic DSLR can do wonders in the right hands. They certainly aren't cheap but they have come down in price at least. Most of my gear is second-hand so that is a viable option.

These pics were all taken using a Sony A230 and its kit lens the SAL1855SAM. These used to sell new for around $450 I think. It's already 4 years old though and inflation never plays fair.

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:51 PM
That is one gorgeous angel you have.

He is quite stunning! Amazingly he is such a softie that I have been able to keep him with my tetras (and similar sized fish) for 5 years without a single problem.

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 04:55 PM
Reading your signature I see that you have an Ancistrus... so do I :). They are amazing fish!

31553

Taken using a Sony Xperia P cellphone

Taurus
01-07-2014, 05:01 PM
Whooooaaaa....used you keep an angel fish with the same coloring. Marbled..he had some koi in him too as well as iridescent pinoy blue.

Very nice angel you have there! thumbs2:


This is probably the star of the tank though...

DeboraBremner
01-07-2014, 05:01 PM
Richard...I understand changing the ISO....and I understand going for a fast shutter speed....but I don't know what you mean by "exposure compensation"?

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 05:38 PM
Richard...I understand changing the ISO....and I understand going for a fast shutter speed....but I don't know what you mean by "exposure compensation"?

As best as I can explain it; exposure compensation or exposure variation (EV) is a setting that changes the brightness of an image before the camera actually takes the picture. Essentially you are telling it that you would like the picture to be darker or brighter than the settings chosen by the camera originally.

In terms of photography light is measured in terms of the 'stop'. This is where you can start playing around with a lot of settings! For example, moving your aperture down one f-stop from F5.6 to F4 will double the amount of light that can enter the camera, which it turn, will double your shutter speed. This will also decrease the depth of field of an image. Higher F-stop equals more depth of field.

The distance from the subject matter will also drastically affect the depth of field.

EV is usually represented by a +- symbol.

Let's say that you want the image to be 1 stop of light darker... you would set the EV to -1.00 and this would double the shutter speed (if all else remained constant).

There are several advantages to using this method when photographing fish:
1) Fish are usually quite reflective so the light shining down on them from the tank lights will look good to you but horrible to the camera. Stepping down the EV will produce a more natural look with regards to the fish's colours.
2) Fish will usually fall under the highlights category and by stepping down the EV the fish will be better exposed and less emphasis will be placed on the surrounding features.
3) Stepping down the EV will increase the shutter speed. Yes, this will make the picture darker but that can always be changed in even the most basic editing program.

Photography is always a compromise with settings since they are all interlinked.

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask me anything else :)

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 05:47 PM
Whooooaaaa....used you keep an angel fish with the same coloring. Marbled..he had some koi in him too as well as iridescent pinoy blue.

Very nice angel you have there! thumbs2:

Thank you! He's magnificent and thankfully not a small fish eater!

Slaphppy7
01-07-2014, 05:53 PM
That Ancistrus is beautiful, too

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 05:55 PM
He bred with my green (I suppose normal colour) female. Unfortunately a Velvet breakout killed them :(. Managed to stop the Velvet quickly though.

DeboraBremner
01-07-2014, 05:58 PM
Thanks Richard...that did explain alot because I do understand F Stop...I once used a voightlander...lol. Think what I really need to do is learn more about setting up a DSLR....as in "Read the Manual" and play more with my camera!! I'll get it....and thanks again!! :22: I'm playing with it as we speak.....lol

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 06:02 PM
Thanks Richard...that did explain alot because I do understand F Stop...I once used a voightlander...lol. Think what I really need to do is learn more about setting up a DSLR....as in "Read the Manual" and play more with my camera!! I'll get it....and thanks again!! :22: I'm playing with it as we speak.....lol

My pleasure :)

What gear do you currently use if I may ask?

DeboraBremner
01-07-2014, 06:18 PM
I'm using a Canon EOS Rebel and have a variety of lenses. 28-80, 50 macro, 75-300 and an 18-75

Richard Peche
01-07-2014, 08:42 PM
I'm using a Canon EOS Rebel and have a variety of lenses. 28-80, 50 macro, 75-300 and an 18-75

That gear will be perfect! You'll probably find yourself using the 18-75 for often than not for this type of photography. The 50mm macro will get some incredible shots but it really shines when shooting from a very close distance and that is not always practical for fish. I find that my 18-55mm is the most commonly used lens.

Another point to remember is that the longer the lens, the faster the shutter speed needs to be to prevent blur from handshake. Image stabilization is not sufficient at the slower shutter speeds when using a big lens.

DeboraBremner
01-07-2014, 09:01 PM
I've been using the 28-80...pretty much the same as the 18-55 (18-75 was a typ o oops..lol.) I only use the macro for "bugs" and 300 when outisde. I'll keep practicing..... I'll get there yet!!!

Richard Peche
01-08-2014, 11:25 AM
The other trick that I use is the "pseudo HDR merge". It produces more accurate colours like so...

31561

DeboraBremner
01-08-2014, 11:46 AM
The other trick that I use is the "pseudo HDR merge". It produces more accurate colours like so...

31561

Beautiful pic!!! I was looking for an "emoticon" of a sentence flying waaaay over my head!!!! lol I think I'll google that... (blush)

Richard Peche
01-08-2014, 12:09 PM
Beautiful pic!!! I was looking for an "emoticon" of a sentence flying waaaay over my head!!!! lol I think I'll google that... (blush)

Haha, nah it's not too complicated! ;). It's deliberately complicated jargon to make photographers sound like they know what they are doing :hmm3grin2orange:

It basically uses a single RAW file from the camera and you artificially make about 3 pictures with different EV settings. Then you merge them into one picture. A true HDR means that you use the EV settings on the camera and take separate pics.

If you have an editing programme then there are usually tutorials on youtube on how to do it. I have Corel's Paint Shop Pro X2.

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and to be honest, it can almost replicate how we physically see the image.

DeboraBremner
01-08-2014, 12:16 PM
I guess youtube would be really helpful...I do have image editing programs from both photoshop and arcsoft, but found the "file merging" rather confusing, so up to this point I take "80" shots...looking for that "one".... :hmm3grin2orange:

Richard Peche
01-08-2014, 12:53 PM
Well, the process looks a little like this:

Three images are artificially created from a single RAW file. The EV or brightness is changed in the RAW to JPG conversion.

Image 1 is set at -1.33
31564

Image 2 is set at -0.67
31565

Image 3 is set at 0
31566

The images can then be "merged" using various processes from layering to a dedicated 'HDR Image Merge' feature. The clarity is set to 50/100 and I leave the brightness adjustment at 0.

The image will be further tweaked with regards to sharpness, contrast, noise reduction and will probably be cropped. The end result from this particular batch is...

31567